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HEALTH

Home Workouts for When You Have Bad Period Cramps

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When I’m sofa-bound thanks to the unceasing, painful jabs of my period cramps, the last thing I really want to do is get up and exercise — curling up in a ball and rocking back and forth sounds much more appealing.

But, the truth of the matter is working out, or simply moving around my apartment, is one of the only things that eases my cramps faster. The Mayo Clinic actually notes that physical activity is one home remedy that can help some women manage their menstrual cramps, and I’m one of them!

My tried-and-true cramp exercise of choice is swimming, but since the pools near me have been closed since March, I’ve had to explore other living room-friendly options. Ahead, the four workouts that push me through the awful aches — and even a few other PMS symptoms.

Peloton Yoga

My cramps kick in a day or two before my period arrives, along with a side of mood swings and increased anxiety. This particular combo of emotional and physical discomfort calls for time spent on my yoga mat — stretching through active Sun Salutations and letting all the stress go during Savasana.

I’ve tried a handful of yoga apps, and Peloton Yoga is by far one of my favourites. The Peloton app, which costs about $13 a month, offers a ton of different types of yoga — like restorative yoga, power yoga, yoga flow, yoga basics, yoga anywhere, and pre- and postnatal yoga — for every skill set and need.

When I feel the faint twinge of a period cramp, I usually turn to a 20 or 30-minute yoga flow session — which combines the perfect amount of active sequences and seated poses.

XB Pilates

I’m definitely not at my perkiest during my period — in fact, I’m kind of a drag. Positivity and an upbeat personality from my workout instructor is what I need in those moments. That’s exactly what you can expect from Andrea Rogers in XB Pilates, available on the Openfit app.

The low-impact pulses and thoughtful, small movements in Rogers’s workouts fire up my muscles, and her encourageing messages always push me through those last few challenging reps. It was in Rogers’s workouts that I learned that lightweight dumbbells are dramatically underrated — an arms series with 2 lb. weights left me sore for days.

P.Volve

Sometimes plyometric moves get a hard pass from me — especially during the first few days of my period. So, when I want to focus on toning my legs, I turn to P.volve, a low-impact, high-intensity workout method that utilises small, mobility-focussed movements and tools like ankle resistance bands and sliders to target hard-to-reach muscles.

POPSUGAR Fitness Videos

When I do have more energy to jump around or get my heart rate up, the POPSUGAR Fitness Youtube channel is where it’s at. Living room cardio can get old pretty fast, but POPSUGAR’s cardio and dance fitness workout spice up the average jumping jack. I’m a huge fan of the no-equipment videos, which also pop up in strength training playlists, too. Trainer Taylor Walker’s 30-Minute No-Equipment Cardio Workout is a solid place to start. If you’re in the mood to target your core, check out 20-Minute Obliques Workout With Jake DuPree.

Click here for more health and wellness stories, tips, and news.

Image Source: Getty Images / Peathegee Inc



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NEWS

Humana plans to send 1 million home screening kits to its members

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Humana said it will send 1 million test kits to its members to allow them to access preventive screenings at home. The insurer said it would send its Medicare Advantage members at-home colorectal cancer screenings and diabetic management test kits. Humana’s Medicaid members will also have access to the diabetic management test kits.

The effort is an attempt to offset delayed care due to the Covid-19 pandemic. In April, several health systems postponed all elective procedures to conserve protective equipment. While most offices have since begun scheduling appointments again, many patients might not feel comfortable going in just yet.

As a result, routine cancer screenings have plummeted during the pandemic. A report by EHR vendor Epic found that screening appointments in March were down between 86% to 94% compared to mean volumes. This, of course, could have long-term implications for patients if it leads to later cancer detection.

“Because of the pandemic, many of our members – who are primarily seniors – have not been comfortable leaving their homes for routine health care,” Humana CMO Dr. William Shrank said in a news release. “Many interactions with health care providers can be conducted virtually, and we encourage telehealth whenever possible. However, patients and doctors should work together to determine when in-person visits are needed, and we are taking every precaution to make sure those visits are safe and that our members have confidence to make the best decisions for their health. During these complex times, patients should not be distancing themselves from their doctors.”

Humana will offer the at-home screenings until September.

Photo credit: SetsukoN, Getty Images

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NEWS

CVS head of specialty pharmacy sees future of healthcare at home after Covid-19

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Mail-order prescriptions are nothing new, but pharmacists have turned to a number of other tools to help patients access their prescriptions during the Covid-19 pandemic.  The head of CVS Health’s specialty pharmacy strategy, Prem Shah, said he expects to see more patients continue receive healthcare at home after the pandemic ends.

Though CVS Health had been building up its arsenal of digital tools before the Covid-19 pandemic, stay-at-home orders forced the pharmacy giant to lean more on them. The company has seen a surge in the use of its support services since the beginning of March.

“We started our journey in the digital space in specialty 5 or 6 years ago,” said Shah, who is executive vice president of specialty and product innovation for CVS Health. “The pandemic has allowed us to really test our capabilities virtually, across the board for the PBM. We quickly realized virtual healthcare and support services were going to be critical with social distancing rules in place.”

For example, the company began offering secure text messaging with a nurse or a pharmacist. CVS Health saw a 30% increase in encounter volume, with some patients asking for help with managing their specialty medication, while others needed help finding supplies beyond the medication itself.

CVS Health also saw an uptick in calls to Accordant nurses, which are trained to help patients with rare conditions. More than a third of the calls were for questions about Covid-19.

Shah said CVS Health had also been working with health plans to help them identify which members face the highest risk from Covid-19, so they could reach out to them and make sure they understood everything that is available to them under their plan.

Looking to the future after the Covid-19 pandemic, Shah expects to see a bigger shakeup in traditional care settings.

“If you were to ask me even three months ago, we would say we have many fragmented sites in which we provide these services,” he said. “One of the things I think you’ll see stick in healthcare… how people think about their healthcare workforce is going to be a little more nimble. You’re not requiring someone to go into a specific setting.”

For example, hospitals have typically been a hub for cancer care. But with the pandemic, CVS Health helped patients that were receiving infusions in a hospital setting transition to in-home care.

“Over time, I think you’ll see care move to patients’ homes,” Shah said.

Telehealth has been another big part of the push to care for patients remotely. But there’s still plenty of room to build on these services.

“The real question with telehealth and these other things has to be how do we improve the quality of care?” Shah said. “The industry needs to push hard, but I do think there’s a better care model.”

Photo credit: Irina_Strelnikova, Getty Images

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HEALTH

How Working Out at Home Changed My Fitness Goals

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The first time I was congratulated for losing weight, I had just gotten my wisdom teeth out. For the past week, the only thing I had been able to stomach was chocolate pudding, plain yoghurt, and lukewarm soup, but my doctor didn’t know that. All she saw were the numbers on the scale ticking downwards — a cause for celebration, not concern.

I liked what my doctor was saying. For once, I felt like I had done something important — like I might actually have a shot at looking like the models I loved to compare myself to. I felt powerful, in control, and enjoyed being praised for what could only be my newfound commitment to health and fitness. In the moment, I didn’t feel like acknowledging that my weight loss was by no means the result of a healthy lifestyle.

I had always been a healthy weight, but was never traditionally thin, so this kind of admiration was new to me. In years past, I would try to suck in my gut during dance class, shrinking my profile in the mirror as much as I could, and becoming frustrated when I couldn’t make my backside look completely flat like the other girls. I became obsessed with my size and thought that if I could just lose a few more pounds, I would look the way I was “supposed to.” I didn’t know how, but I knew that getting thinner was my ultimate goal.

As I went through high school, I placed more and more value on superficial measures of skinniness that (spoiler alert) I was never able to fully achieve. Thigh gaps, flat stomachs, and, most importantly, the numbers on the scale, were the determining factors in how I felt about myself. What I heard that day in the doctor’s office only confirmed my own toxic ideas about weight loss: skinniness meant health, and fitness wasn’t anything without it.

A few years later I was off to college, and most of the exercise I attempted there continued to centre around weight loss. I’d have a great workout and still find myself discouraged if I felt like I was gaining weight. Likewise, I’d pick up terrible eating habits and become delighted once I found that they were helping me become closer to a skinnier ideal.

When social distancing became the new normal, however, my goals were temporarily derailed. I was home, hungry, and didn’t have anyone around me to impress — not even my doctor. Without a gym or any motivation to do anything other than skim through social media and watch Tiger King, I turned to home workouts. Not as a means to lose weight, but as a way to pass the time and keep myself moving during a long period of isolation.

I started off half heartedly with a few videos that promised to target my abs and arms, and they delivered. The next morning my muscles were sore in a new way — a good way — and although I didn’t initially believe that the various sets of crunches and planks would ever become easier, I was interested in the idea that a workout could mean more than just a smaller dress size.

I was finally working out because I wanted to feel like my best self no matter what my body looked like externally.

For the next month, I worked my way through different home workouts, even attempting intense HIIT exercises I used to avoid at all costs. In those four weeks, I grew stronger than I ever had when all I cared about was losing weight. My body was changing in a way I liked, but I was more excited about my ability to fly through the workouts I had initially struggled with, challenging myself in new ways and genuinely enjoying myself in the process. Workouts were now something I looked forward to instead of something I dreaded, and I noticed real progress that had nothing to do with my weight.

It took a few weeks of social distancing and some chaotic circumstances, but I was finally working out because I wanted to feel like my best self no matter what my body looked like externally. Going into my second month of home workouts, I’m continuing to view my health in terms of strength and nutrition, not weight loss and quick diets. Now when I approach my fitness, I remember to be mindful about what it is I actually want to achieve and whether or not I’m being honest with myself about my goals. Home workouts were my unexpected saving grace, but even when the gyms open back up and social gatherings resume, these are habits I’ll want to keep forever.



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FOOD

How to Make VE Day Union Jack Bunting at Home

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UNITED KINGDOM - JUNE 04:  Union Jack flag bunting at street party to celebrate the Queen's Diamond Jubilee in Swinbrook in the Cotswolds, UK  (Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images)

This year’s early May bank holiday isn’t just another public holiday: it marks the 75th anniversary of VE Day (Victory in Europe Day), which commemorates the end of the Second World War.

Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 outbreak and with strict social-distancing measures still in place in the UK, the day’s events won’t quite take place as planned. And while it’s a shame the nation won’t be having neighbourly street parties and spending a day off with our loved ones, it doesn’t mean we can’t raise a glass together in our own homes and make celebratory bunting. Because after all, what’s a national celebration without bunting?

Making “Great British Bunting” to hang in your home and windows is the perfect way celebrate the holiday, and to keep your kids entertained for a few minutes. Luckily, there are plenty of places to get resources and ideas. If you haven’t got much time on your hands (or simply want to avoid all the hassle of starting from scratch), you might want to try templates. These can be downloaded from a bunch of places — the BBC has plain templates, Bells Scambler created celebratory Union Jack ones, and Baker Ross made some colour-in printables. If you want to try something premade, Etsy has lots to choose from. With templates, all you need to create your bunting is: paper, a printer, string to hang it up, sticky tape, scissors, and coloured pens to decorate.

Or, if you’re feeling a little more advanced (think of it as the sourdough of bread making), you can make bunting from scratch using craft materials you probably already have hiding in your house. You’ll need a few things more things to get started, including paper, card, or old cereal boxes, scissors, glue or tape, a ruler, string, and of course, coloured pens, glitter, crayons, and whatever else you fancy for decoration. If you’re unsure on any of the steps, the BBC released a handy picture guide on how to make bunting at home.

So, what are you waiting for? Grab your crafting box and get creative for the bank-holiday weekend.



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HEALTH

Is It OK to Nap When Working From Home? Experts Say Yes

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If the memes we’re all posting are anything to go by, the first weeks of quarantine had us snapping at our loved ones, and feeling unmotivated, sluggish, stressed, and anxious. In a bid to remedy our dismay, we’ve become a nation of banana-bread-baking, video-dating, headstand-practicing overachievers. Sleeping seems to be the one thing we’re not doing much of in a bid to feel as productive as possible. But it turns out, daily naps, far from being a sign of laziness, could be the answer to your quarantine woes.

Our Bodies Are Literally Telling Us to Nap

An effective nap has the ability to boost your mood and leave you more alert — plus our DNA is practically begging for one. “All humans, irrespective of culture or geographical location, have a genetically hardwired dip in alertness that occurs in the mid-afternoon hours,” explained Dr Matthew Walker, a neuroscience professor at University of California, Berkeley. During a typical work day, a Pret coffee run would get most of us through the rest of the afternoon. However, according to The National Sleep Foundation, a nap can bring about a more superior improvement in productivity.

Your ability to work better from home is not the only by-product of this Einstein-approved practise. If you’re feeling like a cranky toddler, a daytime snooze will help alleviate your bad mood, ease tension, anxiety, and stress — which should leave you more upbeat — and get you feeling relaxed and far more patient with those you’re quarantining with (whether that’s your family or your flatmates).

When It Comes to Midday Napping, Timing Is Everything

Napping always feels like a good idea until you wake up three hours later feeling groggy, followed by spending the early hours of the night staring at the ceiling counting sheep. That’s why timing is everything. “If you nap for longer than 20 minutes you will begin to enter the REM stage, which is one of the deepest stages of sleep,” explained Dr Nerina Ramlakhan, a physiologist and sleep therapist. “Interrupting this stage is what gives you sleep inertia, which is that groggy, sick feeling you get after a badly timed nap.”

A successful nap occurs in the light stages of sleep and can feel like you’re neither asleep nor awake. “You’ll most likely still be aware of thoughts, noises, and sensations while being in a deep state of relaxation,” added Ramlakhan.

But Stay Clear of Your Bedroom

How and when you nap is important, too. “That natural dip in energy occurs around 2 to 3pm, making this the best time to power nap. But try to avoid getting into bed, or at the very least under the covers. You don’t want to feel too comfortable, as you’re more likely to sleep longer if you do. This may have a negative impact on the quality of your nightly snooze,” shared Ramlakhan. Dim the lights, ensure the temperature is cool, and avoid wearing anything too warm and cosy; and if your mind is racing, try some white noise or calming music to help you relax.



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HEALTH

Why You Shouldn’t Go Barefoot All Day at Home

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If you’re spending most of your time at home and inside, it would make sense if your footwear preference as of late has been, well, nonexistent. While going barefoot has its benefits (no more lost socks in the washer?), it might not be the best choice when it comes to the health of your joints.

That’s because going barefoot for extended periods of time, coupled with any foot issues you have and the stress the ground puts on the foot, can create a “potentially damaging situation” for your feet, explains Rock CJay Positano, DPM and Rock G. Positano, DPM, MSc, MPH — codirectors of the Non-Surgical Foot and Ankle Service at Hospital for Special Surgery.

“In addition, the connection between proper foot support and architecture has a direct influence on biomechanical functioning of the knee, hip, and lower back,” they explain. “Quite often, we will hear a patient say that when they are barefoot, they experience knee and lower back pain.”

So should you slip on those fuzzy slippers collecting dust in your closet?

Dr. Rock CJay Positano and Dr. Rock G. Positano say that as long as your slippers aren’t thong-style sandals, wearing slippers in the house is a good idea because “at worst, they serve as both a protective barrier and shock absorber for your feet, and at best, they do both plus promote foot function and stability.”

While something is better than nothing, not all slippers — or shoes in general — are created equal.

For the ultimate protection, you’ll want to look for a “supportive” shoe, which is often different than a slipper-type shoe.

“A supportive-type shoe, as a general category, not only absorbs shock and protects the foot but it also keeps your foot in a more favourable position. Generally, a ‘supportive’ type of shoe would include structural elements such as a firm backing or heel counter in shoe parlance, an upper (or top enclosure) with some kind of lacing, and a firm yet substantial midsole,” they explain.

We should add: you might not want to wear the same shoes you wear outside around your home, though.

If you’re on the hunt for brands that offer house slippers and supportive shoes, Dr. Rock CJay Positano and Dr. Rock G. Positano suggest checking out Merrell, Spenco, Mephisto, and Rockport.

If you have concerns about what shoes you’re wearing around the house and/or foot pain, reach out to your doctor to explain your specific situation and get their personalised advice.



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HEALTH

Why a Morning Routine Is Essential When Working From Home

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I’ve always wanted to be a morning person, but if I had to choose between snoozing my alarm for an extra 15 minutes and basically anything else, you’d find me with my eye mask on and curtains drawn, fighting for a few extra minutes of REM sleep.

When I first began working from home, rolling out of bed minutes before my first meeting became even more tempting. But I quickly realised that waking up earlier, just as I would if I needed to commute, is uniquely beneficial because it gives me some time for myself and the opportunity to tackle some small tasks that get my brain going. The result? I feel more energised and focussed and better equipped to get through the workday. Here are the habits I’m putting into practice every morning and why you should do the same.



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FITNESS

Top 10 Leg workouts that can be done at Home: HealthifyMe Blog

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It is not an absolute necessity to attend the gym in order to effectively work the muscles of the legs and bring about significant changes in strength and fitness.
One of the most practical pieces of resistance that you have access to is your own bodyweight. The best part about bodyweight training is that workout can literally be performed anywhere with no need for additional equipment.
This article will provide 10 different leg workouts that can be performed at home to develop fitness and improve the strength and function of the glutes, hamstrings, quads, adductors, abductors, and calves.

10 home-based leg workouts

This section will break down the technique for each of the exercises that are used in the 10 workouts below to allow you to exercise safely and effectively.

1. Squats

– Start by placing the feet slightly wider than hip-width and turn the toes out
– Before initiating the squat, lift the chest, pull the shoulder blades back and down and engage the core muscles
– Drop the body down through the hinging the hips and bending the knees
– Drive powerfully through the heels to propel the body back up to standing

2. Squat Jumps

– Assume the same starting position as a conventional squat
– Drop into the squat and then quickly and powerfully drive up into a jump
– Aim to get as much height as you possibly can
– Focus on a soft landing and use the force generated from the landing to propel you into the next squat jump

3. Reverse Lunge with Knee Lift

– Begin with the feet directly under the hips
– Drive the chest high, squeeze between the shoulder blades and keep the core tight
– Take a backward step and plant the foot before bending at the knees to drop the rear knee to the floor
– From this position, push hard through the heel of the front foot and simultaneous drive the rear knee up towards the chest
– Alternate between right and left side with each rep

4. Side Lunges

– Start with the feet underneath the hips
– Keep the chest lifted, shoulders retracted and core engaged
– Take a large sideways step and bend the knee of the leading lead while keeping the other leg straight
– Drop toward the floor before powerfully driving through the heel to return to standing and then alternate.

5. Curtsy Lunges

– Assume a hip-width stance, keep the chest up, squeeze between the shoulder blades and ensure that the core is tight
– Take a sideways step around the back of the standing leg and plant the foot on the floor
– Bend at the knees to drop down toward the floor before driving powerfully the heel of the planted foot
– Once you have returned to standing, alternate sides and repeat

6. Side Leg Raises

Start by lying on your side with the legs on top of each other
– From this position, while bracing the core and keeping the leg straight, lift the top leg
– Repeat for the prescribed number of reps before swapping sides and repeating

7. Hip Thrusts

– Start in a seated position and place the upper back against an object so that the trunk is at a 45-degree angle
– Place the feet slightly wider than hip-width and ensure they stay close to the backside
– Push through the heels to drive the hips upward and contract the glutes tightly before returning to the floor

8. Single-Leg Glute Bridges

– Start by lying on the back and bring feet in close to the backside
– Engage the core muscles, lift one foot from the floor and drive through the heel of the other foot to drive the hips upward
– Control the descent and return to the floor. Complete the same number of reps on the other side.

9. Heel Kicks

– Start in the quadruped position where both hands and knees are in contact with the floor
– Keep the core squeezed and extend one leg entirely pushing the leg behind the line of the body
– Squeeze the glute tightly at the top of the movement and return to the starting position
– Alternate sides and repeat

10. High Knee Taps

– For this exercise, start with a chair, box or bench in front of you
– Keep the chest up and core squeezed
– From this position, drive the knee up to towards the chest and place one foot up onto the object
– As soon as contact has been made, rapidly switch side

13 Leg-workout Combinations that you can try at home

1) Squat Workout

Exercise Volume  Rest
Squats 3 sets x 15 reps 60 seconds
Jump Squats 3 sets x 15 reps 60 seconds

Workout 1 utilizes the squat and squatting variations in order to develop the strength and function of the quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings, calves, and core.

2) Posterior Workout

Exercise Volume  Rest
Hip Thrusts 3 sets x 15 reps 60 seconds
Single-Leg Glute Bridge 3 sets x 10 reps (per leg) 60 seconds
Heel Kicks 3 sets x 10 reps (per leg) 60 seconds

The posterior workout focuses on exercises that recruit posterior chain muscles such as the glutes, hamstrings, and calves. This workout follows the same structure as the squatting workout.

3) Lunge Workout

Exercise Volume  Rest
Reverse Lunge with Knee Lift 3 sets x 15 reps 60 seconds
Curtsy Lunge 3 sets x 15 reps 60 seconds
Side Lunge 3 sets x 15 reps 60 seconds

As with the previous two, the lunge workout uses three lunging variations to challenge the muscles of the legs and simultaneously develop proprioceptive abilities such as balance and coordination.

4) Comprehensive Leg Workout

Exercise Volume  Rest
Squats 3 sets x 12-15 reps 60 seconds
Hip Thrusts 3 sets x 12-15 reps 60 seconds
Side Lunge 3 sets x 12-15 reps 60 seconds

Workout 4 takes one squatting exercise, one posterior exercise, and one lunging exercise to comprehensively work the muscles of the legs. Volume has been increased through an additional set and a higher number of reps to increase the challenge of this workout.

5) Plyometric Workout

Exercise Volume  Rest
High Knee Toe Taps 3 sets x 12-15 reps 120 seconds
Squat Jumps 3 sets x 12-15 reps 120 seconds
Reverse Lunge with Knee Lift 3 sets x 12-15 reps 120 seconds

Plyometric exercises are often used to develop athleticism, strength, and power. The three chosen exercises should be performed in a plyometric fashion. To effectively perform these exercises, look to generate as much speed and power with each and every rep.

6) Unilateral Workout

Exercise Volume  Rest
Single-Leg Glute Bridge 3 sets x 6 reps (per leg) 120 seconds
Side Leg Raises 3 sets x 6 reps (per leg) 120 seconds

There is a great benefit to be found in developing single-leg strength. Not only will unilateral exercise rapidly build strength, it also helps to even out any imbalances that exist between the right and left leg.

7) As Many Reps As Possible (AMRAP) 

Exercise Volume  Rest
Hip Thrusts 3 sets x 60 seconds 90 seconds
Squats 3 sets x 60 seconds 90 seconds
Curtsy Lunges 3 sets x 60 seconds 90 seconds
High Knee Toe Taps 3 sets x 60 seconds 90 seconds

There is no denying that the AMRAP workout is a challenge regardless of your level of fitness. As the name suggests, the goal is to complete as many reps as possible in a 60-second period.

8) Circuit Workout 1

Exercise Volume  Rest
Side Lunges 30 seconds 15 seconds
Squat Jumps 30 seconds 15 seconds
Single-Leg Glute Bridge 30 seconds 15 seconds

Circuit training is an excellent method of training for improving all-round conditioning and specifically develops muscular strength and endurance. Simply run through exercises one to four and complete as many sets as you desire.

9) Circuit Workout 2

Exercise Volume  Rest
Reverse Lunges with Knee Lift 45 seconds 20 seconds
Heel Kicks 45 seconds 20 seconds
High Knee Toe Taps 45 seconds 20 seconds
Side Leg Raises 45 seconds 20 seconds

Circuit workout 2 is slightly more challenging as the duration of exercise is increased from 30 seconds to 45 seconds. While the rest period is increased, the total work-to-rest ratio is decreased which consequently increases the overall challenge of the workout.

10) Superset Workout 1

Exercise Volume  Rest
a. Squats
b. Squat Jumps
3 sets of 10 – 20 reps
per exercise
90 seconds
a. Hip Thrusts
b. Curtsy Lunges
3 sets of 10 – 20 reps
per exercise
90 seconds
a. Reverse Lunges with Knee Lift
b. Side Leg Raises
3 sets of 10 – 20 reps
per exercise
90 seconds

Supersets are simply two exercises back-to-back without any rest. For superset workout 1, complete 10 reps of both exercises A and B before resting for 90 seconds. Repeat this process for all three supersets.

11) Superset Workout 2

Exercise Volume  Rest
a. Jump Squats
b. Single-Leg Glute Bridge
3 sets of 15  reps
per exercise
90 seconds
a. High Knee Toe Taps
b. Heel Kicks
3 sets of 15  reps
per exercise
90 seconds
a. Hip Thrusts
b. Side Lunges
3 sets of 15  reps
per exercise
90 seconds

As with the circuit workouts, the second superset workout is slightly more demanding than the first. An additional set and a greater number of reps are performed with workout 2 in order to increase the intensity.

12) Tri-set Workout 1

Exercise Volume  Rest
a. Squats
b. Hip Thrust
c. Curtsy Lunge
3 sets of 10 reps per exercise 90 seconds
a. Side Leg Raise
b. Single-Leg Glute Bridge
3 sets of 10 reps per exercise 90 seconds

In a similar vein to the supersets, tri-sets involve performing three exercises back-to-back with no rest between exercises. Only once all three exercises have been completed can you take a 90-second rest. The same principle should be applied to the second set of three exercises.

13) Tri-set Workout 2

Exercise Volume  Rest
a. Side Lunges
b. High Knee Toe Taps
3 sets of 15 reps per exercise 60 seconds
a. Reverse Lunge with Knee Lift
b. Heel Kicks
c. Squat Jumps
3 sets of 15 reps per exercise 60 seconds

The final workout is an advancement on workout 12. In this instance, both the volume and rest periods have been manipulated in order to increase the demand placed on the body. As a result of this, strength levels will increase and a large number of calories will be burned.

Ideal Combinations That Can Be Done For A Week

Workouts 1-4 have been designed to target specific muscle groups of the body and therefore can be grouped together and performed throughout the course of the week in order to onset substantial changes in leg strength.

The circuit, superset and tri-set workouts (workouts 8 – 13) can also be paired together. These workouts are excellent for those who are short of time as the structure of each workout allows you to get through a great quantity of work in a shorter time period.

Finally, the unilateral, plyometric and AMRAP workouts are stand-alone and compliment the other workouts. As a result, these three can be performed separately or alongside any of the other aforementioned workouts.

Summary

By regularly performing a selection of these workouts, significant changes will occur in terms of both the strength and function of the legs and overall conditioning. However, do not feel like you need to complete all 10 workouts, rather select ones that align with your goals, needs, and preferences.



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Shoppers Call Adjustable Coop Home Goods Pillow ‘Godsent’

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Shoppers Call Adjustable Coop Home Goods Pillow ‘Godsent’ – Health

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