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NEWS

Singapore’s MyDoc makes major push into India with UST Global partnership

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Singapore-based digital health startup MyDoc has taken its first major step into the Indian market through a joint venture with multinational IT provider UST Global.

The new partnership expands access to MyDoc’s virtual managed care platform to more than 14,000 UST employees across the Indian cities of Bangalore and Mumbai. MyDoc CEO Snehal Patel said the deal is part of a larger Asian expansion that will continue over the rest of 2019.

The 30-person venture-backed startup is active in India, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Hong Kong and Malaysia and is looking to grow in new markets like Thailand and Indonesia.

MyDoc’s platform aims to provide a single point of access for outpatient care helping patients access telemedicine services, manage chronic conditions, track health data, receive e-referrals to lab diagnostics or specialists and drive users to high-quality, in-network providers.

MyDoc decided on pursuing a joint-venture approach for its first foray into India due to UST Global’s status as a MyDoc investor, as well as its deep understanding of the country’s business environment. Creating a deep business and financial alignment, according to Patel, will allow the company to drive more enterprise sales and create a bulwark in the region for greater expansion.

The startup – which was was founded in 2012 – was informed by Patel’s previous efforts as a healthcare investor for Chandler Corporation, a Singapore-based family office. The U.S.-trained physician and lawyer saw firsthand the fragmented nature of primary care in Southeast Asian markets, largely characterized by a lack of quality and access for patients.

That lack of infrastructure has intersected with larger macro-economic trends, including rising prosperity of the region leading to an explosion of chronic diseases like diabetes, as well as the global phenomenon of rising healthcare costs making it difficult for payer organizations to find profitability in the market.

To that end, MyDoc has signed up major insurers like Aetna, Cigna and AIA Group as partners looking to provide more effective and cost-effective primary care using technology.

“Tech really became relevant when you superimpose the issues around access with the new need for chronic care management,” Patel said in a phone interview.

“It’s not a perfect analogy, but we said ‘can we do in healthcare what has happened in India and China with telecom, where we bypass some of the existing problems and get a new generation onto a virtual system?”

Following through on that business thesis in the region has its challenges, but comes with a few innate advantages as well.

For one, regular health screenings are prevalent across various Asian countries, creating a base level of data and a clinical touchpoint to build off of. Additionally – as evident by the region’s rapid of adoption of platforms like WeChat and WhatsApp – there’s a strong appetite and willingness to try new and unfamiliar technology.

Interestingly, one of the company’s proof points with investors has come in the form of New York-based insuretech startup Oscar Health, which has been able to lower the cost of care by effectively steering patients to virtual channels.

“We want to create the same unit value and cost-savings as HMOs, with a much higher quality consumer experience,” Patel said.

“This is a big year for us and we’ll be looking to fully flesh out our footprint in SE Asia and use our six years of learning and development to bring Fortune 50 companies and blue chip insurers on board.”

Picture: guirong hao, Getty Images

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FOOD

Jams and Pickles | BBC Good Food

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Skills & know how

As well as helping you decide what to cook we can also help you to cook it. From tips on cookery techniques to facts and information about health and nutrition, we’ve a wealth of foodie know how for you to explore.

About BBC Good Food

We are the UK’s number one food brand. Whether you’re looking for healthy recipes and guides, family projects and meal plans, the latest gadget reviews, foodie travel inspiration or just the perfect recipe for dinner tonight, we’re here to help.

Our recipes

All our recipes are tested thoroughly by us to make sure they’re suitable for your kitchen at home. We know many of you are concerned about healthy eating, so we send them to a qualified nutritionist for thorough analysis too.

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FITNESS

How To Do Box Jumps

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When House Of Pain exhorted the world to jump around, jump around, jump around, jump up, jump up, and indeed get down, they were almost certainly not lauding the benefits of adding plyometric exercises to your training regime. But that doesn’t stop the song being great workout advice.

Throwing a few jumps into your workout builds speed and strength, and is especially useful for people hitting the gym to improve their performance in sports. Plus, jumping as high or as far as you can is also fun and a great way to break any monotony that has crept into your workouts.

The box jump is a plyometric move that strengthens your main lower-body muscles – glutes, quads, calves and hamstrings. Box jumps will help make you faster, more powerful and springier than ever, and if you do them for more than a few seconds, they’ll raise your heart rate and burn calories like nobody’s business.

It’s a versatile move, too. “The beauty of box jumps is that you can adjust the height of the box so you can use it for a wide variety of fitness goals,”says personal trainer Joe Spraggan. “ So you can build explosive power and speed using a high box for low reps, or use a lower height to work on foot speed and improve cardio endurance with higher-rep sets. They can also be used, after a proper warm-up, as a great way to fire up your central nervous system ahead of a big legs session.”

“To build explosive power use a higher box and focus on quality reps over quantity. Do up to five sets of five reps – resting for three to five minutes between them – but stop as soon as your form fails,” says Spraggan. “To burn fat and build cardio endurance, use a lower box and do three to four sets of up to 20 reps, resting for up to 60 seconds.”

How To Do Box Jumps

First things first: find yourself a box. Start with a height of around 50cm while you work on getting the form right. Smashing your shins into the top of the box because you’ve aimed too high is no-one’s idea of fun.

Stand in front of the box with your feet shoulder-width apart. Bend into a quarter squat and swing your arms back, then swing them forward and explode up off the ground. Land on the box as softly as possible. You’re aiming to mimic your take-off position on landing – feet flat and knees slightly bent (don’t let them collapse inwards). If you land in a deep squat rather than a quarter squat, it’s a sign that you’ve picked too high a box.

Then jump back down. Again, you’re aiming to land as softly as possible. You can also opt to step down slowly one leg at a time, which will work the glutes even more and safeguard your joints.

To build power with box jumps aim for one to three sets of three to five reps, using as high a box as you can jump on without sacrificing good form.

To use box jumps for conditioning lower the height of the box. Try jumping up and down continuously for five minutes, maintaining good form throughout. You can also build them into a HIIT workout, as your heart rate will rocket if you keep jumping. For the ultimate challenge try doing box jumps until you can remember the name of another House Of Pain song.

Box Jump Variations

One-leg box jump

Halve the number of legs involved in the exercise and the box jump becomes a whole lot tougher. You can take off and land on one leg, or just land on both if it’s proving too tough. The one-legged version is especially good when training for sports involving running, or indeed just running – because unless you’re doing it wrong, you don’t land on two legs when running.

Rotational box jump

Box jumps with a twist, literally. Stand with the box by your side. Leap up and turn to face the box as you go, landing on both feet. Then step down from the box and repeat. Do all your reps facing one way, then turn to face the opposite direction and do your turning box jumps from that side. The rotation movement makes this an excellent exercise for anyone who does sports involving twists and turns of the torso, and it’s especially good for golfers looking for extra power in their swing.

Two-step box jump

Stand about a metre away from the box. Jump forwards once to get closer to the box and then go immediately into another jump up onto the box. This is a more challenging version of the box jump and it can be made even harder by starting further away from the box so you have to take a longer first jump. Don’t get too cocky with the size of your box when doing this variation, especially when you first try it, because it’s easy to go too far forwards with the second jump and rattle your shins on the way up.

Seated box jump

If you’re doing box jumps to build your explosiveness, consider adding this variation to your schedule, because starting from a seated position removes the benefit of the momentum and power generated by squatting before the leap. Set up a bench next to your box – we recommend starting with a box that’s the same height as the bench until you get used to the exercise. Sit down on the bench and swing your arms back behind you, then bring them through and jump onto the box. When you’re sitting facing the box for the first time this will feel like a very bizarre thing to attempt, but once you’re over the mental hurdle of your first jump you’ll quickly get a feel for it.

Weighted box jump

Don’t use a lot of weight. That’s the first thing to say, because you don’t want your body shape to be pulled out of position mid-jump. Use a weighted vest if you can, or hold a light dumbbell in each hand, then perform the exercise as normal. This is a good way to increase the difficulty of the exercise if you don’t have higher boxes.



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WEIGHT LOSS

Royal Family Divorce Rules | POPSUGAR Celebrity UK

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AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND - APRIL 18:  Princess Diana, Princess of Wales and Prince Charles, Prince of Wales play with their baby son Prince William in the gardens of Government House on April 18, 1983 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Anwar Hussein/Getty Images)
Image Source: Getty / Anwar Hussein

Divorce is a fact of life. Sometimes, marriages just don’t work out, and in modern times, couples are generally able to split when they realise that, to pursue happiness elsewhere. But if you’re a member of the royal family, it’s a little more complicated than that. Royal divorces often present their own set of challenges, both in terms of royal precedence and tension between the church and civil decisions.

To begin with, royal divorce is a pretty new thing. When Princess Margaret divorced her husband, Antony Armstrong-Jones, the Earl of Snowdon, in 1978, it was the first divorce for a senior member of the royal family since Princess Victoria, a granddaughter of Queen Victoria, got a divorce from her first husband, Ernest Louis, in 1901. In the years since, however, royal divorces have slowly become more commonplace. In fact, three of the Queen’s four children divorced their first spouses: Prince Charles and Diana Spencer in 1996, Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson in 1996, and Princess Anne and Mark Phillips in 1992.

Royal divorce, in its fundamentals, is no different than civilian divorce: the parties agree to divorce, make a settlement, and sign papers. Since the royal family (and the sovereign in particular) is so closely affiliated with the Church of England, however, royal divorces are a bit more of a scandal. The Church of England does not approve of divorce, nor does it generally look kindly on remarriage when one’s former spouse is still alive. This is why, for instance, Princess Margaret’s divorce nearly cost her many of her royal privileges.

There is no official rule that requires the monarch to approve of royal divorces as she must approve of marriages, but as the head of the family, the Queen has generally been involved in some way when members of her family have gotten divorced. Most notably, she wrote letters that ordered Charles and Diana to divorce after their separation turned into an ongoing series of scandals and media leaks.

The negotiation of titles for divorced ex-royals is also a matter that involves the Queen. After Charles and Diana’s divorce, for instance, the Queen was willing to allow Diana to maintain the style of “Her Royal Highness,” as she had during her marriage. Charles reportedly refused, which led to the compromise: Diana would be styled “Diana, Princess of Wales,” but would not receive the precedence of a HRH. A similar settlement was reached when Andrew and Fergie finalized their divorce: she no longer had a HRH title, but was styled “Sarah, Duchess of York” and continues to use that title to this day. A divorced royal who kept their title in this way, however, would lose that title should they remarry.

WINDSOR, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 12: Prince Andrew, Duke of York Sarah Ferguson and Princess Beatrice of York attend of the wedding of Princess Eugenie of York and Mr. Jack Brooksbank at St. George's Chapel on October 12, 2018 in Windsor, England. (Photo by Danny Lawson - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Image Source: Getty / Danny Lawson

Remarriage itself is a tricky topic connected to royal divorces. Again, because of the disapproval of the Church of England, remarriages of divorced royals walk a delicate line. When Princess Anne married her second husband, Timothy Laurence, in 1992, she chose to be married in the Church of Scotland instead, a sister denomination that does not view marriage as a binding sacrament and thus permits remarriage. The Queen was able to attend this service, since it did not require her to set aside her role as head of the Church of England.

Charles’s remarriage to Camilla Parker-Bowles, however, was technically a civil ceremony, followed by a “blessing,” and the Queen did not attend the civil ceremony (only the less formal blessing). The rules against divorced people marrying into the royal family — as viewers of The Crown know, the rule that doomed Princess Margaret’s romance with Peter Townsend — is no longer a stumbling block, and the welcome that Meghan Markle got is proof of that!

Royal couples who divorce are definitely more common than they used to be, but the process still requires some careful planning to address issues of religion and public perception alike!



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NEWS

Livongo moves into behavioral health with acquisition of Denver-based myStrength

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Mountain View, California-based chronic disease management company Livongo Health has made a major play in behavioral health with the purchase of Denver, Colorado-based myStrength to bolster the offerings on its chronic care platform.

The reasons behind chronic care companies moving into behavioral health conditions is somewhat self-evident. There are long established relationships between behavioral health conditions like depression and anxiety and chronic conditions like diabetes and hypertension.

In fact, of the roughly 135 million people in the country with at least one chronic condition, around 20 million also are dealing with a behavioral health issue.

There’s also a business rationale: Leading companies in digital health increasingly take on a platform approach to appeal to employer and health system customers overwhelmed by the variety and volume of point solutions on the market.

To that end, Livongo purchases Retrofit last year, a Chicago-based startup that provides weight-management and disease-prevention programs. The new acquisition is the next step in the greater industry consolidation.

“Health care is getting more confusing and more complex and more costly all the time,” Livongo Health Executive Chairman Glen Tullman said in a phone interview.”

“(Our customers) say ‘we wanted innovation but I don’t want to deal with 20 different companies and have each go through my security, contracting, legal and privacy requirements. It’s a hassle. Can’t you just have one company that makes it easy for us?”

Denver, Colorado-based myStrength offers mobile and web-based resources and therapies to address conditions such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, substance use and stress with techniques like mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Tullman said the decision to acquire myStrength came after a year long process to survey the space and identify the best candidate to bring on board. Key to the decision, according to Tullman, was myStrength’s strong clinical evidence base, high customer satisfaction and existing traction with more than 130 health plans and health systems across the country.

While Tullman refused to disclose the exact financial terms of the acquisition, he characterized the deals as in the tens of millions.

The myStrength news comes fresh off the heels of competitor Omada Health’s effort to add on similar services using technology developed by failed behavioral health startup Lantern.

Earlier this month, the San Francisco, California-based company announced that it would be launching new programs for depression and anxiety utilizing technology produced by defunct startup Lantern, which announced it was shutting down commercial operations last year after failing to find a viable revenue model.

“If you go to Lantern’s site right now it literally says ‘we failed,’” Tullman said. “That’s their entry. Compare that to our entry which has 135 partners using it, multiple years in business and provable results and you say to yourself ‘well, one of these companies is serious.’

In terms of venture capital investment, the company is ahead of its rivals. Since its founding in 2014, Livongo has raised around $240 million from investors including Kleiner Perkins, Echo Health Ventures, and Tullman’s own firm, 7wire Ventures.

The acquisition comes in what looks to be a period of rapid growth at Livongo, which recently brought on former Cerner President Zane Burke as CEO to help the company scale to its next stage. Tullman said in January alone, Livongo brought on board 250 new customers, adding to a roster that includes blue chip companies like Lowe’s, Target and Delta.

“This move will now allow us to focus on both the physical and behavioral health of our members and strengths our ability to bring our clients a broader, more personalized offering,” myStrength CEO Scott Cousino said in a statement.

Existing myStrength customers will continue receiving uninterrupted service and Livongo users will be offered the option to tack on additional behavioral health functionality as part of the Livongo software app.

“So all of a sudden without changing their app, without getting a new device, without any of that, they can get access to behavioral health,” Tullman said.

Alongside the incorporation of myStrength’s capabilities and the addition of the company’s nearly 50 employees, Livongo has also added two key executives with long histories in the mental health space to bolster its impact in the space.

Anmol Madan, the former CEO and co-founder of behavioral health startup Ginger.io has joined Livongo as its chief data officer. Julia Hoffman, who previously served as the national director of mental health services for the VA, has also joined Livongo as its vice president of behavioral health strategy.

Picture: Radachynskyi, Getty Images

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FITNESS

How To Do The Thruster

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The front squat and the overhead press are both superb exercises for building strength and size, so it makes sense that merging the two into one combo move creates something pretty darn effective.

The thruster is that compound move, and it works muscles and joints throughout the body to great effect. It can be done with a barbell, dumbbells or kettlebells with equally good results and it fits easily into a weights session or HIIT workout. It’s an especially popular exercise in the CrossFit community, and you know how that bunch love doing compound moves at speed.

The squatting part of the moment targets all the major muscles in your lower body, with your quads, hamstrings and glutes all put to work. As you move the weight up your core takes over, and then the overhead press section strengthens the entire upper body and your shoulders in particular.

How To Do The Barbell Thruster

Stand with the bar in the front squat rack position, holding it with your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Keep your elbows as high as you can as you lower into a squat. Keep your knees wide apart and your heels down. Lower until your thighs are at least parallel with the ground.

Drive up through your heels using your quads and glutes. Maintain that momentum as you come to the top of the squat and use it to help you push the bar over your head until your arms are locked out. Then bring the bar back down to your chest to complete one rep.

You can approach the barbell thruster in two ways. Going for a heavier weight and doing low reps will help you build power. Alternatively use a lighter weight and up the reps for a fat-torching, high-intensity workout.

How To Do The Dumbbell Thruster

The form doesn’t differ much, but there are benefits to doing the move with dumbbells. First, if you have any wrist or shoulder issues that flare up when using a barbell, using dumbbells might be more comfortable because you hold them with your palms facing during the thruster, rather than the overhand grip used with a barbell.

The other major advantage dumbbells have over barbells is that they’ll train each side of the body separately, so you can’t rely on one stronger side to push the weight up. Identifying and addressing imbalances in your muscles is important for reducing the risk of injury. If you notice that one side struggles with a weight that the other is managing comfortably when doing the thruster, it’s worth targeting your weaker side in your workouts until both sides are equally strong.

To do the dumbbell thruster hold two weights by your shoulders, with your palms facing. Drop into a squat, then push up and press the weights straight overhead until your arms are fully extended. Then lower the dumbbells back to the starting position.

How To Do The Kettlebell Thruster

The kettlebell thruster offers many of the same benefits as the dumbbell thruster, working each side of the body separately to expose and correct any weaknesses, but there are a couple of reasons to use kettlebells instead of dumbbells. One is that you might only have kettlebells available (a very good reason, that) and the other is that the off-centre load of the kettlebell can provide an extra challenge to your core while you perform the thruster.

Hold two kettlebells in the rack position by your shoulders with the bell resting on your forearm and your elbows pointing down. Drop into a squat, then drive back up and push the kettlebells overhead.

How To Do The Single-Arm Thruster

This is one of the rare occasions where halving the weight can increase the challenge of an exercise, to your core at least. Holding only one dumbbell or kettlebell during the exercise (don’t do single-arm thrusters with a barbell, obviously) means your body has to work to resist rotating towards that side, strengthening your core muscles. You might find that a lighter weight is required to avoid being pulled over to one side, but otherwise perform the dumbbell or kettlebell thruster as normal, holding the weight by your shoulder and pushing it overhead as you come out of a full squat.

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FOOD

Snacks | BBC Good Food

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Skills & know how

As well as helping you decide what to cook we can also help you to cook it. From tips on cookery techniques to facts and information about health and nutrition, we’ve a wealth of foodie know how for you to explore.

About BBC Good Food

We are the UK’s number one food brand. Whether you’re looking for healthy recipes and guides, family projects and meal plans, the latest gadget reviews, foodie travel inspiration or just the perfect recipe for dinner tonight, we’re here to help.

Our recipes

All our recipes are tested thoroughly by us to make sure they’re suitable for your kitchen at home. We know many of you are concerned about healthy eating, so we send them to a qualified nutritionist for thorough analysis too.

Tell us what you think…

Love the new look or think we’ve missed the mark? We want to hear your thoughts – good and bad – to make sure we make the new website as useful as possible.

Magazine

Subscribe to BBC Good Food magazine and get triple-tested recipes delivered to your door, every month.

Follow us

Join the BBC Good Food community by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and Google Plus.

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FITNESS

How To Do A Hanging Knee Raise

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If you’ve tried to sculpt a six-pack in the past, you’ll probably be more than familiar with crunches. But this exercise alone will do very little to build abs. Crunch-style moves only really target your upper abs, so you might – with low-enough body-fat levels – build a two-pack, but you’ll be four short of the full monty. That’s why it’s important to dedicate as much training time to your lower abs as it is to your upper ones, and there are few moves better for that than the hanging leg raise.

It may be one of the most basic abs moves, but it’s also one of the best because as well as working your lower abs, it also activates your entire core to develop strength in the deep-lying stabilising muscles of your midsection – and it challenges your grip and forearms too.

How To Do A Hanging Knee Raise

Hang from a pull-up bar or gymnastic rings with your body straight, using an overhand grip. Bend your knees and use your lower abs to raise your legs until your thighs are parallel with the ground. Lower under control. Aim for high-rep sets to fully fatigue the target muscles, and the slower you can perform each rep – under complete control – the better the results will be and the faster you’ll see them.

Hanging Knee Raise Variations

Hanging obliques knee raise

Switch the focus of the exercise to the obliques by raising your knees to the sides rather than straight up. The obliques, which run down the sides of the central abs, are key players when you twist your torso as well as helping to stabilise your spine. For this exercise, alternate the side you lift your knees up towards.

Hanging knee twist

Another variation on the hanging knee raise that targets the obliques rather than the central core muscles. This time you keep your knees raised throughout and slowly rotate them from one side to the other.

Hanging leg raise

The hanging knee raise is a great exercise in its own right, but it’s also often treated as a way to progress towards the L-sit, which is one of the best – and toughest – abs exercises in the business. Hang from a bar with your body straight, using an overhand grip. Engage your abs and raise your legs, keeping them straight, until they are at 90° to your torso. Then lower your legs back to the start under control.

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Advocate Aurora Health and Oak Street Health will open primary care center for Medicare patients

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Medicare

Advocate Aurora Health, a nonprofit system with hospitals and care sites in Illinois and Wisconsin, has teamed up with Oak Street Health to open a primary care center for adults on Medicare.

The new center, which is expected to open in April, will be located in Elgin, Illinois, a northwest suburb of Chicago.

Founded in 2012, Oak Street Health is a Chicago-based company that operates a network of primary care centers specifically for Medicare patients. It accepts anyone with Medicare, including Original Medicare Part B, select Medicare Advantage plans, Medicare Supplement or Medigap plans and Medicare-Medicaid plans.

Currently, it has centers in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Oak Street patients don’t only receive primary care services — they also get transportation to office visits, insurance education, access to a 24/7 patient support line and community activities and events.

The ultimate goal of the company’s model is to focus on the quality of care, keep patients healthier and keep hospitalization rates lower.

The collaboration with Advocate Aurora Health represents Oak Street’s first partnership with a large integrated health system. It’s also Advocate Aurora’s first partnership with a healthcare company focused only on the Medicare population.

“By shifting focus towards quality of care instead of volume of services, there has been a meaningful improvement in reducing hospital admissions and emergency room visits,” Oak Street Health co-founder and CEO Mike Pykosz said in a statement. “We know Advocate Aurora Health shares that vision, and as a national leader in population health, is the right partner to expand our services in the northwest suburbs of Chicago.”

Through a partnership with Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode Island, Oak Street Health also plans to open primary care centers in the Ocean State this spring. Two will be in Providence and a third will be in Warwick. BCBSRI members will receive access to Oak Street’s approach to primary care.

Photo: designer491, Getty Images

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Attention Footballers: Get A Free Supplements Pack Courtesy Of Man Utd And SiS

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Runners, cyclists and gym-goers are all over energy and recovery supplements, but it’s fair to say amateur footballers aren’t quite as keen. The pros are, though, especially now that players cover more distance and complete more sprints in a game than ever before. And while you may find you’re covering less distance and completing fewer sprints than ever before (hey, time takes its toll on us all), it’s worth remembering football is especially demanding because it’s an endurance and an anaerobic sport.

Supplements company Science in Sport has been working with Manchester United since 2008, but to celebrate a recently announced multi-year partnership SiS is giving away 100,000 supplement packs for amateur players to try. Just pay £2.99 P&P and you’ll get isotonic energy gels, an energy and caffeine gel, an energy sachet, a recovery sachet and tube of hydration tablets. Go get yours at scienceinsport.com/football, and then come straight back because we spoke to SiS nutritionist Ted Munson to find out how pro footballers use supplements and when they might come in handy for amateurs looking to improve their performance on the pitch.

Got your pack? Good. The first thing Munson told us, as any responsible representative of a supplements brand would, is that footballers should take a “food first” approach, only looking at supplements if a food can’t be used or it’s not practical to use food.

Munson explained that because of the anaerobic demands, footballers rely heavily on carbohydrates, but carbs aren’t always easy to take on – especially during half time. “Taking on food might be hard to digest,” Munson explains, “so the pros use something isotonic. If you take on 40g of carbs at half-time that can give you the energy stores for the last ten minutes.”

And then there’s the fact that a lot of five-a-side footballers play at lunch or straight after work. The pros follow a standard routine of eating a main meal three hours before kick-off, topping up with a snack at T-minus 90 minutes. “That makes sure everything is digested and you’ve got nothing sitting in your stomach,” Munson says. Sure, you could break out a quinoa and chicken salad for a second lunch at work before an evening game – but it might be frowned upon in the middle of a pay review. Instead, as Munson explains, “food is the first approach, but you can use carbohydrate gels beforehand just to top up energy stores.”

Caffeine is another supplement that can help. “Caffeine actually decreases the perception of fatigue,” Munson says, “and makes it feel like you’re not working as hard as you actually are. It’s used in a similar way by professional athletes to reduce that perception of fatigue. You could have a coffee on the way from work or a caffeine shot ready in your bag.”

Munson also suggests a protein shake after a game, because “that’s the ideal time to take on protein for adaptation” – by the time most get home from the ground and sit down to a meal, the window of recovery has closed.

The most important piece of advice Munson has for amateurs, however, has nothing to do with supps. It’s that unless you have a really nice mum, you are not catered to like a professional footballer.

“Elites get a pre-match meal put in front of them and they get their shake put in front of them and they don’t have to carry it all round,” Munson says. “The number one piece of advice is to plan in advance. Especially for 11-a-side. If you’ve got a 10am game, get up early and have a good breakfast. I play Saturday league myself and I’ve been guilty of waking up at 9am, waltzing in and feeling horrendous during the game. There’s a lot of easy improvements you can make just by planning.”

Sign up to get an SiS match-day supplement pack at scienceinsport.com/football

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